Global

My writing on international affairs which does not focus on domestic politics within countries. Whether it is US policy towards Syria, nuclear diplomacy with Iran, or Russia’s relations with the rest of the world you can find it here.

"Both Sides are in the Wrong" Seccesionist Gamesmanship in Spain and the Myth of Excessive Force

The Spanish government was in a no situation with regards to the Catalan referendum. Precedent showed that allowing it to proceed would have established its legitimacy, whereas enforcing the law was a PR disaster

October 3, 2017
October 3, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

The Worst of Timing: Why Scotland's Second Bid for Independence Will Earn a Cold Shoulder From the EU

The decision of the Scottish Government to seek a second referendum is a gamble that the panic surrounding Brexit will disguise the fact that the prospects for an independent Scotland are worse than in 2014

March 16, 2017
March 27, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Why not break up Bosnia?

Twenty years after it successfully ended a war, the Dayton structure has failed miserably at building a stable and united Bosnia in peace. Why not allow the state to split up?

February 27, 2017
February 27, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Germany's Boring Election: Is Merkel's Reserve of Political Lives Growing Short?

As Germans prepare to go to the polls, the greatest threat to Angela Merkel is neither anger over her asylum policy, nor populism of the right or left. Nor even is it new SPD leader Martin Schulz. It is boredom itself

February 13, 2017
February 13, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Symbiotic Polarization: How Intersectionality Birthed the Alt-Right

For all the venom directed at "Facists" by leftwing activists throughout history, the truly revolutionary forces on the right have always taken their inspirationn from the example set by their leftwing counterparts

February 9, 2017
February 9, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

2016: The Year History Ended

A decade ago it was common for neoconservative thinkers to claim that 9/11 marked the end of the "End of History" that began with the end of the Cold War. With hindsight, it merely marked the midpoint.

November 21, 2016
March 27, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

More July 20th 1944 than Reichstag Fire: Thoughts on the seriousness of the Turkish coup

The complexity of Friday's has led to a focus on whether or not the coup was somehow "staged".That is to miss the importance of how politics in Turkey has become about one man, and effective opposition about killing him.

July 16, 2016
July 19, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

The United States and the EU Referendum

Regardless of what the proper American policy should be, Barack Obama's intervention in the EU referendum campaign was almost certainly a mistake. For him, for David Cameron, and for both countries.

April 25, 2016
May 12, 2017
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Transitions are Hard: Zimbabwe and Venezuala

The recent victory of the opposition alliance in elections for Venezuala's National Assembly provides both the possibility of change, and the danger that politics will now move into a struggle to the death.

December 8, 2015
July 13, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

The Eurogroup and SYRIZA's Cowardly Referendum

When looking back at the handling of Greece since 2008, it is unlikely anyone will emerge covered in glory. But when measured by such standards, the behavior of everyone involved in Greece's referendum is abominable

June 29, 2015
July 13, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Comrade Bob's Final Victory: Mugabe's Succession and Zimbabwe

The recent struggle for succession in Zimbabwe is a remainder that informal networks of power will almost always prevail over formal constitutional procedure in non-democratic states.

December 15, 2014
July 1, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Hagel and the Return of the End of Realism

The resignation of Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel marks the final eclipse within the Obama Adminstration of those realist Republicans who defected during the last decade through disatisfaction with the Iraq war.

November 28, 2014
June 30, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Repeating the Mistakes of 1936, Europe Risks Marginalizing Itself on the World Stage

International policy is about making choices about different priorities. In 1936, European powers failed to weigh the relative importance of Italy's alliance against Hitler with Ethiopia's independence and lost both.

August 25, 2014
July 13, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Turkey after the Local Elections

The focus by the international media on the integrity of the results in Turkey's recent local elections detracts from the important lesson that while the AKP is politically mortal, the opposition remains fragmented.

April 1, 2014
July 16, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

A Look Back: Thoughts About Yugoslavia, Sovereignty, and Western Inaction

The prerequisite for any sort of effective action within the Ukraine is to decide whether Kiev is facing a domestic rebellion for an outside invasion. Failing to do so means confusing the lines about the use of force

March 29, 2014
July 13, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

How Turkey's Elections This Weekend are Tomorrow's Geopolitical Crisis

Turkey's local elections this weekend are the first occasion on which the ruling AKP party faces the prospect of a substantial loss of support. How they respond will determine the future of democracy in Turkey.

March 26, 2014
November 1, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Majority rule: Turkey’s Taksim Gezi Park protestors must join the electoral process or perish

Turkey's opposition has to abandon fantasies of military coups and delusions that the AKP will implode while they do nothing in order to recognize that only broadening their appeal can they challenge Erdogan for power.

July 2, 2013
July 16, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman

Minorities, the Politics of Proximity and Seccession

The "American" experience has often been cited as a successful counterpoint to unsuccessful efforts at assimilation elsewhere. But America's success may owe less to culture, and more to distance than is commonly assumed.

June 30, 2016
Written by 
Daniel Berman